and will show regular image. I meant it! In the case of SVG fonts, the URL points to an element within a document containing SVG font definitions. But could this be so simple? As with other URLs in CSS, the URL may be relative, in which case it is resolved relative to the location of the style sheet containing the @font-face rule. You can use normal stuff like :hover though. I am then including the logo using the method. An alt attribute allows a user to view the image description, even when it fails to render on a device, in addition to providing context for search engines. That’s it and it works great! The examples below embed the SVG code directly into the HTML code. I even converted my logo to an svg — the language seems straightforward enough. Cool article though, thanks, For IE7 – 8 and crossbrowers there is You can change the size of it though just by selecting the img and changing its width or height, again like you could a PNG or JPG. This only works with embedding of SVG files as far as I’ve tested. I’ve started playing with the Raphaël JavaScript Library. I’ve been using this method as a fallback for SVGs as background images –. (You can also just open the SVG file in a text editor and grab that code.) @svg at-rules generate SVG elements available to CSS. There are a number of ways to use SVG on the web; browser support is very good with support only lacking in IE8 and below, and really early versions of the Android browser. After some further unintentional science, I seem to experience occasional problems using .svg as a background image with height and width, which are fixed by deleting height and width within the .svg and only using css to scale the image. Chuck a filter in your : Then you can apply that in your CSS as needed: Inline SVG has it’s own set of browser support, but again, it’s essentially only an issue in IE 8 and down and Android 2.3 and down1. How consistently (device-agnostic) to fill the viewport? This simple svg examples show the code below. sounds like a codepen I’m going to have knockout. $(‘img[src$=”.svg”]’).each(function() { if (!Modernizr.svg) { But, if you want the CSS stuff to work, you can’t use an external stylesheet or

I did come across one ‘issue’ that maybe worth mentioning as I couldn’t find anything mentioning it. Specifying font resources using url() and local(). Some suggest to simple use a gigantic SVG so you never upscale, only downscale. You can drop that code right into an HTML document and the SVG image will show up just the same as if you put it in an img. My viewport was missing!! This is awesome, Thanks Chris. I am however wondering if any one can assist me with an issue I am tackling. Right but you probably don’t cache the HTML very hard, if at all. IE≥9 prioritizes valid font formats over invalid ones. What we saw earlier with the inline CSS representation is a little special. SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is vector image format based on an XML for 2D graphics. Ssrc SVG: SVG Plugin for Internet Explorer. I solved the problem above by using a hover on a group, defining an opacity 0 rectangle inside, then having my path. jQuery: If a browser doesn’t support SVG and you want to provide a fallback for your content, you might as well attempt to replace all of them. In all instances the svg’s are set as background images in the CSS. Will do in future for sure! Simply paste in the contents of your SVG file and fill out the form and it will display the results in a textarea for you to copy. Canvas matters in SVG just like it would in PNG or JPG. The svg i’m trying to embed are not basic svg. I think we could do more with the SVG compared to the Canvas, but by its slowness, we have to resort to the canvas. That’s because they are both essentially XML (named tags with angle brackets with stuff inside). :(. I mistakenly assumed that my host had this by default. You can save the file directly from Adobe Illustrator as an SVG file. In theory you can get use un-encoded svg in data uri’s, but browser support is a bit flaky: http://rod.vagg.org/2012/05/data-uri-svg/, Fantastic article. However, the gradient gets stretched to the full length of the content instead of the viewport for longer pages. Modernizr adds a class name of “no-svg” to the html element if it doesn’t support SVG, so we use that: Another clever progressive enhancement flavored technique for using SVG as background-image is by using it in conjunction with multiple backgrounds. I have seen many people suggesting different things but there should be at least one that works well for styling and manipulating with CSS…. Specifically because SVG sometimes is exported with that as the opening line, which will cause the PHP parser to choke on it. Upload the old, download the new. If you use it on your logo, which is on every page, wouldn’t that make the entire site in-cacheable? The Raphael commands are embedded in the HTML, which makes the page size a bit larger than before, but it hasn’t affected page performance noticeably and the pages are now served with a single HTTP request instead of several. https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=600207. SVG is a lightweight vector image format that’s used to display a variety of graphics on the Web and other environments with support for interactivity and animation. $this.attr(‘src’, $this.attr(‘src’).replace(/svg$/, ‘png’)); Design something in Adobe Illustrator. The inside of the envelope is transparent. A PHP command line tool for converting SVG images to a set of CSS icons (SVG & PNG, single icons and / or CSS sprites) with support for image optimization and Sass output. Note that SVG elements have a special set of CSS properties that work on them. They look awesome on a Retina display! Requests both, displays neither, — Tim Kadlec (@tkadlec) February 25, 2013. I hope that makes sense. I’ve experienced scaling problems with using width and height attributes in svg, and never seem to have problems just eliminating them. The snippet I used was (is still?) But when you open the app created from the same html5 with phonegap and run into the same device the dropshadow filter is not rendered. (I have also made a pen at http://codepen.io/anon/pen/zviwF but most of the time the error doesn’t show until you resize the window). Modernizr can help us here, and in a more efficient way than using img. One tricky part is taking the SVG's default markup and url-encoding it to make it work in CSS. Wow, great article Chris. I did make my .svg in ILL cs3 and used DW cs3 to html and upload… I tried it every way even your other opts and still – I think it works but my .svg shows as text code in image area with scrolls… I even tried all the different opts when saving .svg found on various sites… hmmm can u help? Great Article! Plus, I had to disable a ‘pasteboard’ setting to allow it to copy vectors files as-is from other mac apps. But I think this is pretty neat to get it to work, though. Can you re-open the image in Inkscape? Then pretend I knew your address. What I have noticed however is that the graphics do tend to look slightly different across browsers. I have cleaned it manually and it seems, it is OK now: http://www.phoca.cz/cssflags/#australia (make F5 – refresh the site as the wrong SVG can be cached). @Christos Inskape saves as “Inkscape SVG” or as “Plain SVG” – the latter is the format you want for the web. Like in http://codepen.io/anon/pen/oFhzA One last puzzle for me is the danged css. Check out this side by side close up of apple.com’s menu, which uses a SVG sprite. It’s pretty and seems powerful. I’ve tried all of the workarounds for FF, and they all seem to be less than 100% effective. HM. I’m using for testing a HTC one X with the latest android distribution. I’ve made a fiddle in: http://jsfiddle.net/uK2La/ Not a problem in modern browsers, but your usual suspects (IE 8 and lower and possibly IE9) have trouble with this. Gosh. I managed to add the dropshadow as a filter directly into the svg. Just one quick note: If you have a SVG file, you don’t have to explicetly save it as “code”, an SVG file is per already “written in code”. :D, Raphael is a very necessary library when working with SVG! Raphaël’s goal is to provide an adapter that will make drawing vector art compatible cross-browser and easy. In fact in the case of SVG, it’s probably better NOT to use base64. And if you find some polygon formulas, it makes it really easy to make complicated shapes (I’ve built something for hearts, stars, and triangles). It allows you to import .svg files in multiple ways depending on the resource query you provide. It was very helpful for me, since we plan to use it in some Apps (Webkit only). As only one image is loaded there is no fallback. In the header (which as position: fixed) I used a div tag with the svg as background, and in the footer I used it as a img tag. Very good writeup, maybe better than MDN as far as practicality goes. This means every graphical object you create is also a DOM object, so you can attach JavaScript event handlers or modify them later. I’ll have to get to work on them for my websites. http://caniuse.com/svg. Print your label at home. Thanks for pointing that out. If we replace the background-image with a supported format, only one HTTP request will be made instead of two. Doing it with SVG has allowed me to interact with the charts in Javascript, for example I can highlight a plot on the chart when the user hovers over a name in the legend. Another way to use SVG’s is to convert them into Data URL’s. From the article, it seems that this should be the default behavior. background: url(thepngone.png); Also, if using Inkscape there’s some pointers here for how to optimise: http://benfrain.com/tips-for-using-svgs-in-web-projects/, Another cool feature with svg : you can use media-queries inside the

svg src url

Browsers which do not support SVG will ignore unknown tag svg and thanks to image is replaced with img will read the code as: and will show regular image. I meant it! In the case of SVG fonts, the URL points to an element within a document containing SVG font definitions. But could this be so simple? As with other URLs in CSS, the URL may be relative, in which case it is resolved relative to the location of the style sheet containing the @font-face rule. You can use normal stuff like :hover though. I am then including the logo using the method. An alt attribute allows a user to view the image description, even when it fails to render on a device, in addition to providing context for search engines. That’s it and it works great! The examples below embed the SVG code directly into the HTML code. I even converted my logo to an svg — the language seems straightforward enough. Cool article though, thanks, For IE7 – 8 and crossbrowers there is You can change the size of it though just by selecting the img and changing its width or height, again like you could a PNG or JPG. This only works with embedding of SVG files as far as I’ve tested. I’ve started playing with the Raphaël JavaScript Library. I’ve been using this method as a fallback for SVGs as background images –. (You can also just open the SVG file in a text editor and grab that code.) @svg at-rules generate SVG elements available to CSS. There are a number of ways to use SVG on the web; browser support is very good with support only lacking in IE8 and below, and really early versions of the Android browser. After some further unintentional science, I seem to experience occasional problems using .svg as a background image with height and width, which are fixed by deleting height and width within the .svg and only using css to scale the image. Chuck a filter in your : Then you can apply that in your CSS as needed: Inline SVG has it’s own set of browser support, but again, it’s essentially only an issue in IE 8 and down and Android 2.3 and down1. How consistently (device-agnostic) to fill the viewport? This simple svg examples show the code below. sounds like a codepen I’m going to have knockout. $(‘img[src$=”.svg”]’).each(function() { if (!Modernizr.svg) { But, if you want the CSS stuff to work, you can’t use an external stylesheet or

I did come across one ‘issue’ that maybe worth mentioning as I couldn’t find anything mentioning it. Specifying font resources using url() and local(). Some suggest to simple use a gigantic SVG so you never upscale, only downscale. You can drop that code right into an HTML document and the SVG image will show up just the same as if you put it in an img. My viewport was missing!! This is awesome, Thanks Chris. I am however wondering if any one can assist me with an issue I am tackling. Right but you probably don’t cache the HTML very hard, if at all. IE≥9 prioritizes valid font formats over invalid ones. What we saw earlier with the inline CSS representation is a little special. SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is vector image format based on an XML for 2D graphics. Ssrc SVG: SVG Plugin for Internet Explorer. I solved the problem above by using a hover on a group, defining an opacity 0 rectangle inside, then having my path. jQuery: If a browser doesn’t support SVG and you want to provide a fallback for your content, you might as well attempt to replace all of them. In all instances the svg’s are set as background images in the CSS. Will do in future for sure! Simply paste in the contents of your SVG file and fill out the form and it will display the results in a textarea for you to copy. Canvas matters in SVG just like it would in PNG or JPG. The svg i’m trying to embed are not basic svg. I think we could do more with the SVG compared to the Canvas, but by its slowness, we have to resort to the canvas. That’s because they are both essentially XML (named tags with angle brackets with stuff inside). :(. I mistakenly assumed that my host had this by default. You can save the file directly from Adobe Illustrator as an SVG file. In theory you can get use un-encoded svg in data uri’s, but browser support is a bit flaky: http://rod.vagg.org/2012/05/data-uri-svg/, Fantastic article. However, the gradient gets stretched to the full length of the content instead of the viewport for longer pages. Modernizr adds a class name of “no-svg” to the html element if it doesn’t support SVG, so we use that: Another clever progressive enhancement flavored technique for using SVG as background-image is by using it in conjunction with multiple backgrounds. I have seen many people suggesting different things but there should be at least one that works well for styling and manipulating with CSS…. Specifically because SVG sometimes is exported with that as the opening line, which will cause the PHP parser to choke on it. Upload the old, download the new. If you use it on your logo, which is on every page, wouldn’t that make the entire site in-cacheable? The Raphael commands are embedded in the HTML, which makes the page size a bit larger than before, but it hasn’t affected page performance noticeably and the pages are now served with a single HTTP request instead of several. https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=600207. SVG is a lightweight vector image format that’s used to display a variety of graphics on the Web and other environments with support for interactivity and animation. $this.attr(‘src’, $this.attr(‘src’).replace(/svg$/, ‘png’)); Design something in Adobe Illustrator. The inside of the envelope is transparent. A PHP command line tool for converting SVG images to a set of CSS icons (SVG & PNG, single icons and / or CSS sprites) with support for image optimization and Sass output. Note that SVG elements have a special set of CSS properties that work on them. They look awesome on a Retina display! Requests both, displays neither, — Tim Kadlec (@tkadlec) February 25, 2013. I hope that makes sense. I’ve experienced scaling problems with using width and height attributes in svg, and never seem to have problems just eliminating them. The snippet I used was (is still?) But when you open the app created from the same html5 with phonegap and run into the same device the dropshadow filter is not rendered. (I have also made a pen at http://codepen.io/anon/pen/zviwF but most of the time the error doesn’t show until you resize the window). Modernizr can help us here, and in a more efficient way than using img. One tricky part is taking the SVG's default markup and url-encoding it to make it work in CSS. Wow, great article Chris. I did make my .svg in ILL cs3 and used DW cs3 to html and upload… I tried it every way even your other opts and still – I think it works but my .svg shows as text code in image area with scrolls… I even tried all the different opts when saving .svg found on various sites… hmmm can u help? Great Article! Plus, I had to disable a ‘pasteboard’ setting to allow it to copy vectors files as-is from other mac apps. But I think this is pretty neat to get it to work, though. Can you re-open the image in Inkscape? Then pretend I knew your address. What I have noticed however is that the graphics do tend to look slightly different across browsers. I have cleaned it manually and it seems, it is OK now: http://www.phoca.cz/cssflags/#australia (make F5 – refresh the site as the wrong SVG can be cached). @Christos Inskape saves as “Inkscape SVG” or as “Plain SVG” – the latter is the format you want for the web. Like in http://codepen.io/anon/pen/oFhzA One last puzzle for me is the danged css. Check out this side by side close up of apple.com’s menu, which uses a SVG sprite. It’s pretty and seems powerful. I’ve tried all of the workarounds for FF, and they all seem to be less than 100% effective. HM. I’m using for testing a HTC one X with the latest android distribution. I’ve made a fiddle in: http://jsfiddle.net/uK2La/ Not a problem in modern browsers, but your usual suspects (IE 8 and lower and possibly IE9) have trouble with this. Gosh. I managed to add the dropshadow as a filter directly into the svg. Just one quick note: If you have a SVG file, you don’t have to explicetly save it as “code”, an SVG file is per already “written in code”. :D, Raphael is a very necessary library when working with SVG! Raphaël’s goal is to provide an adapter that will make drawing vector art compatible cross-browser and easy. In fact in the case of SVG, it’s probably better NOT to use base64. And if you find some polygon formulas, it makes it really easy to make complicated shapes (I’ve built something for hearts, stars, and triangles). It allows you to import .svg files in multiple ways depending on the resource query you provide. It was very helpful for me, since we plan to use it in some Apps (Webkit only). As only one image is loaded there is no fallback. In the header (which as position: fixed) I used a div tag with the svg as background, and in the footer I used it as a img tag. Very good writeup, maybe better than MDN as far as practicality goes. This means every graphical object you create is also a DOM object, so you can attach JavaScript event handlers or modify them later. I’ll have to get to work on them for my websites. http://caniuse.com/svg. Print your label at home. Thanks for pointing that out. If we replace the background-image with a supported format, only one HTTP request will be made instead of two. Doing it with SVG has allowed me to interact with the charts in Javascript, for example I can highlight a plot on the chart when the user hovers over a name in the legend. Another way to use SVG’s is to convert them into Data URL’s. From the article, it seems that this should be the default behavior. background: url(thepngone.png); Also, if using Inkscape there’s some pointers here for how to optimise: http://benfrain.com/tips-for-using-svgs-in-web-projects/, Another cool feature with svg : you can use media-queries inside the